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Abstract=An epic tale of love, honour and sacrifice. Set within the mystic jungles of Nusantara in the 8th Century. Temenggor - a vast jungle where tribes seek sanctuary, a land rife with Paganism, infested with bloodthirsty ravagers, yet enchanted by age-old secrets tucked away only to be passed down generations later; Feisal Azizuddin; Creators=Wong King Wai; Aqilah Deenah

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The Temengor Dam or Temengor Hydro-Electric Project or Temengor Power Station is a dam in Gerik, Perak, Malaysia. It is located on Perak River about 200 km northeast of Ipoh. Construction of the dam impounded Temenggor Lake. Power station The power station is a hydroelectric power station, using 4 Hitachi turbines of 87 MW installed capacity and the average annual energy generation 900 million units. The station is operated by Tenaga Nasional. Since 1987 Temenggor has been unmanned and is remotely operated via a SCADA system at the Bersia Group Control Centre. In the late 1990s, facilities were added to enable Automatic generation control by TNB's National Load Despatch Centre in Kuala Lumpur. Overview Construction started in January 1974 and completed in mid-1978. The first unit commissioned on 1 October 1977. Technical specifications The permanent dam components are as follows: Main Dam Maximum height above foundation of 128 metres (420 ft), and crest length of 537 metres (1, 762 ft), volume of fill is 7. 09 million cubic metres. Crest elevation is 258 metres (846 ft) above sea level (ASL), Full Supply Level (FSL) is at EL 248. 42mSLE, average operating level is at EL244. 00mSLE, minimum operating level for Unit 1, Unit 3 and Unit 4 is at EL 236. 5mSLE. For Unit 2, it can go down to EL 221mSLE. Reservoir area at 245 metres (804 ft) ASL is 152 square kilometres (59 sq mi). Storage volume is 5, 300 million cubic meters at EL 244. 00mSLE. At FSL total storage is 6, 050 million cubic meters. Power Intake Structure - 4 bays. Spillway - free flow spillway, weir with chute and flip bucket. Maximum discharge capacity at Reservoir Flood Level at EL 252. 00mSLE is 2830m3/s. At this elevation the dam is holding 890million cubic meters of flood water or equivalent to 3months of annual average rainfall. This water will be discharge to downstream gradually in not less than one month. Power Tunnels - 4 tunnels. Length about 850 ft Average diameter 5. 5m, steel lined Powerhouse surface powerhouse with 4 penstocks to powerhouse comprising 4 turbines of 87MW each, 4 air-cooled generators of 100MVA each and 4 transformers of 100MVA each. Turbine type is vertical Francis, manufactured by HITACHI of Japan. Turbine shaft rated output is about 90MW at rated gross head of 101m. Maximum plant discharge is 4X100m3/s. Plant rated annual energy production is 870GWh based on annual rainfall of 3, 700 million cubic metres. Temenggor Dam is now the third largest dam in Malaysia. It was once the largest dam and largest hydroelectric generation facility upon completion in 1979, before being overtaken by the Kenyir Dam in 1985. It holds a special place in the history of Malaysia for its military role in flooding the Upper Perak River and cutting off the communist terrorists' infiltration route from the Betong salient in Thailand. See also Tenaga Nasional References Temengor Hydro-Electric Project, The resident engineer's completion report, Vol. 1, Report 5067-01-80, June 1980 External links TNB webpage [1] [ permanent dead link] Coordinates: 5°24′24″N 101°18′04″E  /  5. 40667°N 101. 30111°E This page was last edited on 21 October 2019, at 04:06
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Temenggong telok blangah in chinese. Something went wrong, but don’t fret — let’s give it another shot. Temenggor lake accommodation. Temenggong jugah. Temenggor boat house. Temenggor. Temenggor Lake Tasik Temenggor Location Peninsula Malaysia Coordinates 5°19′N 101°12′E  /  5. 31°N 101. 20°E Coordinates: 5°19′N 101°12′E  /  5. 20°E Type Reservoir Basin  countries Malaysia Islands Banding Island Temenggor Lake ( Malay: Tasik Temenggor) is a lake in Hulu Perak District, Perak, Malaysia. It is the second largest lake in Peninsula Malaysia after Kenyir Lake in Terengganu. This man-made lake is located south of 1, 533 m high Ulu Titi Basah peak. [1] It was created after the construction of Temenggor Dam to generate electric power. The lake is located about 45 km from the Hulu Perak district capital, Gerik. There is a man-made island, Banding Island (Pulau Banding) [2] and Lake Temenggor Bridge on the East-West Highway which crosses the lake. Recreational activity [ edit] The lake seen through NASA satellite image. The Perak Fisheries Department is tasked with implementing the Temenggor Lake Management Plan. Lake Temenggor is divided into Conservation Zones, Recreational Fishing Zones and Commercial Zones. The Conservation Zone covers the northern part of Temenggor Lake as the Sungai Kejar, Sungai Tiang and Sungai Gadong. Freshwater fishing culture [ edit] Lake Temenggor was developed as a freshwater fish breeding site. The river fish are exposed to extinction due to toxic waste disposal, smuggling and use of chemicals and fish bombs, electric and tubular shock. Since 1997, the Perak Fisheries Department has issued freshwater fish stems and seeds through the Central Fisheries Center (PPD) at Banding. PPD Banding is fully operational since 1 November 2006 and serves as an extension center providing technical advice, information and reference center. High value fish such as Kelah, Temoleh, Baung, Clubau, Tengas, Loma, Tengalan, Sebarau and Lampam river can be found here. Many prawns are found in Perak River, Kinta River and Kampung Dew River in Kamunting, Taiping. The Malaysia-Norway joint venture company, Trapia Malaysia Sdn Bhd, operates tilapia fish farming in Lake Banding on a commercial basis. Lake Temengor is targeted with producing 40, 000 tonnes of fish per year from fish cage activities by 2013. [3] Accidents [ edit] On 15 December 2007, 3 soldiers were killed when logs fell on their tents. The three victims were from 21 Royal Malay Regiment ( RAMD) Pengkalan Chepa, Kelantan who patrolled the Belum Forest. Those killed were Corporal Fauzi Yamat, 35, from Kelantan; Personnel Mohd Yazman Yaakub, 35, from Pasir Putih, Kelantan and Private Roslin Hassan, 22, from Setiu, Terengganu. Injured troops were Lt Shah Amirul Izham Shamsul Kamar; Lans Kpl Mohd Yusri Yusuf, Prebet Mohd Izham Ishak and Prebet Amar Mohamad Nordin. The victims were evacuated by a Royal Malaysian Air Force ( RMAF) helicopter. [4] Notable features [ edit] Belum-Temengor Temenggor Lake Bridge Malaysian Public Works Department (JKR) East-West Highway Monument Orang Asli village See also [ edit] East-West Highway Temenggor Dam References [ edit] External links [ edit] Perak Tourism - Temenggor Lake [ permanent dead link] Belum website.

Temenggor hydroelectric power plant. Temenggong. Belum-Temenggor is in Perak of Malaysia. Understand [ edit] Belum Temenggor is the largest rainforest in the Malay Peninsula. It is believed to have been in existence for over 130 million years making it one of the world’s oldest rainforests, older than both the Amazon and the Congo. In the heart of the forest lies a manmade lake covering 15, 200 Hectares which is dotted with hundreds of islands. Belum-Temenggor is still relatively low key in regards to tourism making it easy to enjoy the tranquility of the jungle and increasing your chances of spotting wild animals. History [ edit] The Orang Asli (Native Aborigines) were the first inhabitants of the Malay Peninsula, and many of them were traditionally nomadic or semi-nomadic. Semi-nomadic Orang Asli can be found today on the islands of Temenggor. They live in their traditional way in bamboo huts, hunting small mammals using blowpipes, fishing and gathering plants and honey from the forest. Conservation [ edit] As with all of Malaysia's rainforest, government sanctioned deforestation for logging and agriculture is one of the main contributors to environmental decline in Belum-Temenggor. The Malay peninsula has lost over half of its natural forest cover since 1950. The comparably small amount of forest left in the Malay peninsula is still being cut down by government approved logging companies. Illegal logging also persists adding to an already problematic situation. It is anticipated that, at present rates of deforestation, more than 50% of Malaysian forest species will become extinct, many of them endemic to this area. When the depleted areas are replanted it is usually with exotic commercial species in monocultures. There are many NGO's and lobbing groups currently trying to educate the Malay people and influence government policies, focusing on short term gains and destroying the ecosystem is detrimental not only to our environment but to future economic development. Poaching activity continues in the area with arrests made and poaching camps and snares uncovered frequently. Due to the relatively low numbers of local residents and tourists litter is not too prevalent. When visiting this beautiful forest please help with conservation by leaving nothing behind other than footprints. Landscape [ edit] Belum-Temengor is centred by Tasik Temengor (Temengor Lake), stretching 75KM the lake is surrounded by dense rainforest, mountains, waterfalls and dotted with hundreds of islands. Flora and Fauna [ edit] Fauna Belum-Temenggor's relatively untouched forest is home to a wide variety of flora and fauna including 14 of world's most threatened mammals including the Malaysian tiger, Asiatic elephant, Sumatran rhinoceros, white handed gibbon, Malaysian sunbear and tapir. Other animals that also roam freely include seladang, wild boars, numerous species of deer, pythons and cobras. Belum Temengor is ideal for bird watcher with over 300 avian species including the hornbill. It is the only existing forest where you can spot all 10 species of hornbill that inhabit Malaysia consisting of the white-crowned hornbill, bushy-crested hornbill, wrinkled hornbill, wreathed hornbill, plain-pouched hornbill, black hornbill, Oriental pied hornbill, rhinoceros hornbill, great hornbill and helmeted hornbill. Flora In the forest you can find 3, 000 species of flowering plants, including 3 species of Rafflesia, the world's largest flower. Climate [ edit] The temperature in Belum-Temenggor ranges from 20°C to 35°C depending on the time of year, peaking between July and August. The rainy season lasts from mid-November until January. There are cool breezes from the lake and intermittent showers almost all year round. Get in [ edit] Belum Temenggor is intersected by the East West Highway running from Butterworth to Kulim to Gerik and then on to Kota Bharu. The main access point for accommodation and sights is the boat jetty at Pulau Banding. By Bus Buses run from Kuala Lumpur to Gerik where you can get a fixed rate taxi to Pulau Banding public jetty for RM 50. Alternatively if coming from Ipoh, Penang, Kota Bharu or any other destinations using the East West Highway you can ask the bus driver to stop at the Pulau Banding jetty, though you will have to pay the full fare for the journey. Fees/Permits [ edit] Belum-Temenggor, although inhabiting the same area, is actually split into two separate reserves. Royal Belum State Park and Temenggor Forest Reserve. The Royal Belum State Park boundary starts at the very north of Temenggor lake (Tasik Temenggor)and is protected by the local army base. Permission for entry is granted by the park authority an takes 10 days for processing. A guide is essential for visitors wishing to explore the park. Temenggor Forest Reserve encompasses the majority of the lakeand its surrounding area, starting from the south of Royal Belum State Park. There is no park fee and no approval is needed to enter. Get around [ edit] The majority of the sights and activities lie in and around Temenggor Lake. Almost all the accommodation options in the area will provide pick up from the jetty to their respective islands and transport to the areas of interest. It is also possible, if solely interested in a day trip, to arrange boat tours of varying lengths from the jetty. See [ edit] [ add listing] Do [ edit] [ add listing] Eco-Tourism is what this area is all about and there are many excellent attractions in the area including; • Jungle Treks and wild animal tracking • Animal spotting at the salt licks. These are natural mineral deposits where wild animals, including Elephants and Tigers, go and lick for their nutrients. There are wildlife viewing huts called bumbungs that overlook the areas. • Bird Watching, at it's best from August to October when it is possible to spot flocks of literally thousands of Hornbills of all 10 Malay species • Visit the protected site of the Rafflesia (the world’s largest flower) • Visit to the local Asli tribal village and experience their traditional way of life • A trip to the jungle watchtower situated high above the canopy offering spectacular views. • Kayaking, swimming and various other watersports • Sport fishing • Trips to some of the many waterfalls feeding into the lake. Buy [ edit] [ add listing] Eat [ edit] [ add listing] Drink [ edit] [ add listing] Sleep [ edit] [ add listing] There are few options for accommodation around Lake Temenggor. Some large hotels are situated on the mainland adjacent to the public jetty and alongside the main highway. Others are situated on private islands on the lake itself, allowing better access to the nature and wildlife. Lodging [ edit] Belum Eco Resort – located on a secluded island. Offering accommodation options including private chalets, shared dormitories and houseboat. 3 day 2 night packages and à la carte pricing is available. [1] Tel: +605 281 0834 Email: [ [email protected]] you, its quite pricey to the budget traveler, and food options are very limited. Camping [ edit] Backcountry [ edit] Stay safe [ edit] Visitors with limited mobility are not advised to participate in jungle treks as trails can be slippery and uneven. When in the jungle it is essential to be with an experienced guide as wild animals can be unpredictable. The most dangerous aspect of the area is the water. If you are not a confident swimmer, always wear a life jacket. Get out [ edit].

Lowest price $107 The struck out price is based on the property’s standard rate, as determined and supplied by the property. $96 available on 03/16/20 Price may be available on other dates Free WiFi Free parking Pool Air Conditioning Main amenities 103 guestrooms 2 restaurants Outdoor pool Rooftop terrace Breakfast available Spa services Business center 24-hour front desk Air conditioning Daily housekeeping Garden Library Free WiFi and free parking Feel at home Rollaway/extra beds (surcharge) Connecting/adjoining rooms available Free toiletries Garden Daily housekeeping Hair dryer What’s around Belum Jetty - 1 min walk Landmark Bridge - 8 min walk Malaysian Armed Forces Monument - 16 min walk More about the area Value Value for money could be better ® Rewards Book this hotel and collect nights after your stay Belum Rainforest Resort, Temenggor from $96 Azlanii, Garden View Balau, Garden View Chengal, Garden View, Bathtub Chengal, Lake View, Balcony, Bathtub Tualang, Lake View, Balcony, Bathtub Landmarks Belum Jetty - 1 min walk Landmark Bridge - 8 min walk Malaysian Armed Forces Monument - 16 min walk Getting around Ipoh (IPH-Sultan Azlan Shah) - 151 min drive Key facts Hotel size This hotel has 103 rooms Arriving/leaving Check-in time starts at 3 PM Check-out time is noon Guests requiring transfer services must contact this property in advance with arrival details. For more details, please contact the property using the information on the reservation confirmation received after booking. This property is located in the rain forest, guests arriving by bus or driving to the property should contact reception well in advance for driving instructions. Please contact the property using the information on the reservation confirmation received after booking. Required at check-in Credit card, debit card, or cash deposit required for incidental charges Government-issued photo ID required Travelling with others Children Up to 2 children stay free when occupying the parent or guardian's room, using existing bedding No cribs (infant beds) Pets No pets or service animals allowed Internet Free WiFi in public areas Free WiFi in rooms Transportation Parking Free self parking Extended parking Payment types at the property * See small print for additional details or extra charges Continental breakfast daily (surcharge) 2 restaurants Room service (during limited hours) Water dispenser Outdoor pool Spa services on site Bicycle rentals on site Ecotours on site Hiking/biking trails on site Billiards or pool table Business center Number of meeting rooms - 2 Conference space Conference space size (feet) - 1475 Conference space size (meters) - 137 24-hour front desk Concierge services Tours/ticket assistance Free newspapers in lobby Luggage storage Multilingual staff Porter/bellhop Safe-deposit box at front desk Designated smoking areas Rooftop terrace Garden Library Fireplace in lobby Television in common areas Accessible bathroom In-room accessibility Wheelchair-accessible parking Blackout drapes/curtains Turndown service Premium bedding Rainfall showerhead Bidet Free toiletries Hair dryer Daily housekeeping In-room safe Connecting/adjoining rooms available Also known as Belum Belum Rainforest Hotel Gerik Belum Rainforest Resort Malaysia/Gerik, Perak Belum Rainforest Temenggor Belum Rainforest Resort Resort Belum Rainforest Resort Temenggor Belum Rainforest Resort Resort Temenggor Belum Rainforest Resort Temenggor Belum Rainforest Gerik Belum Rainforest Resort Belum Rainforest Resort Gerik Belum Resort Rainforest Belum Resort Rainforest Resort Belum Resort Belum Policies The property has connecting/adjoining rooms, which are subject to availability and can be requested by contacting the property using the number on the booking confirmation. Please note that cultural norms and guest policies may differ by country and by property. The policies listed are provided by the property. Mandatory fees You’ll be asked to pay the following charges at check-in or check-out: A tax of MYR 10. 00 per accommodation, per night is imposed by the country of Malaysia and collected at the property. Permanent residents and Malaysian nationals are exempt from the tax. For more details, please contact the property using the information on the reservation confirmation received after booking. Optional extras Rollaway beds are available for an additional charge Continental breakfast is offered for an extra charge of MYR 45 for adults and MYR 25 for children (approximately) We have included all charges provided to us by this property. However, charges can vary, for example, based on length of stay or the unit you book. The forest reserve is amazing, great place for a quiet retreat & to be immersed with nature. The staff were very friendly & helpful & spoke good English. The rooms were very comfortable & clean. However there was NO TV in our room & NO WIFI signal despite the fact they provided it. We were disappointed with the food, both for the quality & the taste, it was too overpriced for what was offered. The pool was great, overlooking the lake & mountains. I can’t comment much on the activities as we only stayed for 2nights, some of the activities are dependent on whether there are enough people signing up like the house boat ride. We went on the jungle trail & were advised to start with the lakeside trial & end with the main trail. However we didn’t finish the lakeside trail as it was more challenging than we thought, at one point the trail was rocky & steep & trees had fallen across the narrow path, not knowing what lies ahead we turned back, definitely not recommended for kids/elderly or 1st timers. Overall, we had a relaxing trip. Voon Li, my 2 night romance trip Overall the hotel is nice.. Improvement could be to install umbrella/ shady plants at common top deck area as it was too hot to stay and view the lake. Tiang Meng, my 2 night trip with friends Amazing stay, it would’ve been more great if the kids room is available. The kids room is closed due to no usage Noor Balkhis, my 2 night family trip We first given a room that once we got in, the toilet had some foul odor. Upon complaining this to the front desk, we were quickly given a different room. Loved the prompt response. However the room sizes were totally different. The replacement room was much bigger and had the lazy/evening bed that was promoted in the website, however when we arrived we didn't get a room with a lazy bed. NOT sure if this was something to do with booking via or something else. Everything was good with the resort, however they had parking issues, and my car was damaged while parking by someone who was either backing in or out. What was disappointing though was that the staff choose not to inform me of the damages when they first knew about it. I really think they need to get more CCTV's to ensure safety of the patrons and their vehicles. The resort is known for its hospitality though, and the swiftness of their staff and employee's, they didn't fail me there. Just a little disappointed with my recent predicament Roobaganesan, my 2 night romance trip The hotel is ok not fantastic but the area is superb. The half day boat trip was well worth doing. Trekking through the rainforest listening to elephants trumpet then seeing one at the waters edge was very special. The visit to the aboriginal village was not commercial at all. Definitely worth a visit. Chris, ca 2 night romance trip Is the description of this hotel not correct? Tell us Hotels Malaysia Hotels Temenggor Hotels Belum Rainforest Resort.


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Temengor. Temenggor power station. Temenggor dam. Temenggor perak. Temenggor boathouse. Temenggor bridge. Temenggor is calling — find the perfect hotel Everyone wants to score a deal on travel, but price is just one factor to consider when booking an unforgettable hotel. Whether you’re visiting family, attending a conference or taking a well-earned vacation in Temenggor, having an awesome experience should be a no-brainer. Hotwire will hook you up! From restful nights near your flight to that prime spot in the city’s heart, we’ve done our research to bring the best options to your fingertips. Book your Temenggor hotel with us now and start your next adventure. You’re not the average traveler — and we know it You’ve done your homework and know exactly where you want to go. We’re here to help with some Hotwire travel geek-approved tips on how to save on your booking. Get away for the weekend Hotels in bigger cities usually charge higher rates during the week, when people are traveling for business. Weekends can be a bargain! It’s the other way around for vacation spots, so if you’re looking for a beach escape, consider a mid-week trip. Give yourself some wiggle room If your plans are flexible, play around with some different travel dates – a shift of a few days either way can help you save big. Prices usually jump the weekends before and after popular holidays, so we recommend steering clear of them. Or consider visiting during the off-season, when prices are generally lower. Plan around big events Are prices surprisingly high? There might be a huge conference or festival in town. Consider shifting your dates if you can. Of course, if that’s why you’re going, you’ll have to bite the bullet. We’ll still work to get you the best rates out there. Noodle over new adventures Set aside time to plan what you want to see, taste and discover. Nothing completes a trip, big or small, like a few new experiences! Check city apps or area websites to find out what’s new and what events are happening during your stay. Even during a family reunion, you can detour to that locals-only fish taco stand or under-the-radar music club. Your cousins will be impressed.

Temenggor lake tasik banding. Field of Mirrors Ever heard of the Temiar or the Jahai? Or perhaps on a more familiar note - the Senoi or the Negritos? These are names; names of tribes we call ‘the Orang Asli’. There are 18 Orang Asli or indigenous tribes in Peninsular Malaysia. Many of the tribes prefer to live by lakes where they reap the profits. In Tasik Bera lives the Semelai, in Tasik Chini lives the Jakun and here at Tasik Temenggor are two tribes: one called the Jahai, the main sub-ethnic group of the Negrito; and the other called the Temiar which forms the main group of the Senoi. But the difference is that the Orang Asli people living in Temenggor lake didn’t used to live by a lake for there wasn’t a lake during the time of their forefathers. Not until 1975, when the construction of Temenggor’s Hydro Electric Dam began. Temenggor was in fact, a pristine valley where Orang Asli peoples roamed and lived. Despite occasional sabotage acts by the Communist Party of Malaya(CPM), the project went ahead and was finally completed in 1977. Within a year of completion, the entire valley was flooded, creating an 18, 000hectare pool of water measuring 80km long, 5km wide with a depth of 124metres (at its deepest). The loggers who were retained to work on the areas were taken by surprise by the unexpected rise in water level after the dam was completed. Their equipment is still sitting, idling at the bottom of the lake. Not only are there logging equipment found at the bottom of the lake but also an entire village called Kampong Temenggor, Padang Cermin (Field of Mirrors) - what used to be a training ground for the anti-Japanese resistance Force 136; and also the Orang Asli’s ancestral grounds. The villagers totalling 400 were airlifted from the village and relocated to a government-built village by the edge of the lake. No rescue attempts were made to save the stranded animals because of the threat of communist attacks then. The flooding eventually created 80 islands from the 80 hills that used to make up the landscape of Temenggor valley. The many tributaries bring cool fresh water down from the surrounding highlands and also acts as nurseries for the lakes abundant fish stock. Dream Therapy About 5, 600 Orang Asli live at Temenggor, made up of the Temiar, the Jahai and the Kinchu tribes. The Jahai tribe is a sub-group of the Negrito. They are generally shorter, darker skinned and have very tightly curled hair. They lead a semi-nomadic life, engaging in a little bit of hunting, a little bit of gathering, a little bit of fishing and a little bit of cultivation. The forefathers of the Jahai were nomadic people and they lived on lands until the food in the area has been exhausted whence they moved again. Today, many of the Jahai people live in settlements provided to them by the government but there remain a few families who have retained their own villages outside of the settlements. The Temiar tribe is the other major Orang Asli population residing in Temenggor. H., the first anthropologist to study the Temiars, described them as the ‘happy people’. Also known previously as the Northern Sakai, the Temiar communities were often raided by foreigners. Until as recent as the 1930’s these foreigners captured and sold the Temiar to the slave trade. As a result the Temiar remains to this day - incredibly shy, with a general mistrust of strangers. These gentle folk have no written script and speak a Mon-Khmer language called Temiar. They live in extended social structures and share their catch as well as their money, clothing and other items. In the Temiar language, there isn’t a word for “to marry”. The old ways of the Temiars did not warrant couples to marry and the practice of polygamy was widely accepted. But as times are changing and influences of other religions come into play, the Temiars now live in individual huts rather than in the longhouses that used to serve their ancestors. However, the tribe maintain the same building structures as their ancestors have taught them. Many Temiars have converted to the Muslim faith but there are others who practice their animistic ways. They remain strong believers of their ‘religion of psychotherapy’ - also called the ‘Senoi Dream Therapy’. The Temiar individual believes that dreams are a mythical experience in which the person’s soul wanders about the forest in search of guidance. In other words, they communicate with their spirit guides through dreams. Even their dances and songs are dream-inspired. Religious ceremonies for the Temiar often concentrate on performances by spirit mediums at night and it involves an intoxicating performance of choral singing, dancing (bersewang) and trances. It has been mentioned that the women’s choral singing is rendered as one of the finest native choral music in South East Asia! The basis of the Orang asli’s survival is to maintain the mutual respect they have for their environment as have their fathers and the fathers before them. They ask for little and are contented with living at the fringes of their jungle. But their future may be in jeopardy for there are plans to assimilate them into a show-and-tell performance agenda for future ‘eco-tourists’. There is a danger that one day soon, if not professionally managed, these admirable tribesmen and women will be reduced to showpieces like what the North Americans once did to the heroic ‘Geronimo’ and the Indians. A day’s trip to the Sira We stayed at Banding Island Resort (now known as Belum Rainforest Resort) on the first night after arriving late in the evening in time for a beautiful fiery sunset over the lake. It took us roughly 5 1/2 hours (and 300km) on a leisurely drive from Kuala Lumpur to Banding Island and through some of the most scenic roads in the Peninsular. Perhaps one of the main reasons that the area has retained its natural state, is because of the CPM. From 1948 until 1989, the entire forest of Belum and Temenggor was considered a ‘black area’ and was placed under a State of Emergency. The communist party of Malaya (CPM) were extremely active in the area. According to sources, the East-West Highway was proposed by an army general who believed that with a road cutting through the area would hamper the communists’ movements. So if we were to drive through the area in those days, there would be a 6. 00pm to 6. 00am curfew on travellers using the road. To be stranded between those times along the highway meant that the traveller would be on his locals would dare enter the area after dusk. During the early years, this road was constantly under threat of being bombed and sabotaged by renegades. But since the signing of the Haadyai Accord in 1989, all that has subsided and peace reigns over the area now. (except for the marching loggers and the rowdy eco-tourists! ). The forest canopy reflects a spectrum of autumn colours, tightly knitted into the blue horizon like a lovely, cosy, warm cardigan. The beauty of undisrupted forest cover is indescribable. The warmth and the voice of the rainforest beckons the unsuspecting to venture into the heart of Mother Nature’s creation. Standing at one with the forest at Temenggor, it is unimaginable ……. we are stepping into a geological prehistory. The ancient limestone hills are dated at 220million years old. Some of the limestone islands at the southern reaches of the lake were once majestic rock cliffs dating back to 400 million years ago… the Jurassic era which stands only at 22million years ago. These are said to be among the oldest outcrops in Malaysia. Armed with such rich information about the wonders of the rainforest, we headed off for a day’s trip to scour and explore the area. The one day trip with 2 guides and a boat ride can cost some RM140 to RM210, depending on the distance from the take off-point and back. We hopped onto a speed boat and was whisked away. Skimming over glassy clear water, shooting pass numerous islets along the way. Upon hearing the wrrrrr of the boat’s engine, Orang Asli children came running to the edge of their little island, frantically waving at us with smiles stretching from ear to ear. We waved back, watching their tiny little faces dissolve into the horizon as our boat bounded ahead - deeper into the upper reaches of the lake’s tributary. There were many little islands occupied by small groups of Orang Asli and we soon learnt that the other unoccupied islands are for sale. That piqued our interest, for wouldn’t it be a dream come true to own an island… that you can call HOME? The dream bubbles above our heads soon popped upon hearing the words of warning from our guide, ’ But the only problem is that the islands disappear during the rainy season, when the water rises. ' Now, wouldn't that be just our luck! The wind in our hair soon sent those thoughts far away from our minds. Along the way, there were floating barges manned by Thai workers. They were apparently underwater loggers. Armed with just a chainsaw and a breathing hose, they dive as deep as 100feet to harvest the large logs from the bottom of the lake. These men really make a living out of risking their lives. underwater logging 45minutes into the boat ride, we arrived at Kampung Chiong where we registered ourselves before the trek. It is mandatory for trekkers to register at the post - in case any unfortunate incidents should occur, the authorities are able to trek us. (or identify us! ) Our objective for the day’s trek was to make it to the Sira or the natural Salt Lick. Now, armed with rich knowledge of the forest after the briefing and the reading - one would believe that it would be a totally enriching experience, right? For many that would be true… why was it that no one told us about the lee…. eeeeeek…ches?! It takes a little while to accustom to the fact that we were no longer in the domain of our little creature comforts and that this is now the domain of creatures’ comfort! We trekked through brooks that flowed sparkling clear crisp cold water, collected and funnelled down from the surrounding limestone hills. Cupping to our lips, we tasted water for the first time. So sublime it soothed our parched throats like sweet honey from the heavens. Agua de beber! We were going through the motion as if for the first time. Even the ubiquitous leeches gave us a reason to believe that with such a population of blood-suckers out here, there certainly should be as many hosts too. In most cases, that is true…leeches only survive where there is an abundance of food. Then it dawned on us…there may be quite a few pairs of eyes squinting back at us through the veil of lianas not too far away. A disgruntled sound from a close distance confirmed that we really were being spied on. But it was only a wandering wild boar. Only! We arrived at the salt lick 1½ hours later. Salt licks are natural salt and mineral pans found in the forests. Animals especially herbivores and sometimes omnivores, visit the salt licks for their daily or weekly supply of mineral supplements of which they lack in their daily diet of vegetation. These areas are extremely important for the well being of the wild animals that live there. Unfortunately, poachers have also found these spots rather fruitful too. Salt licks are usually covered with all types of animal tracks. The Sambar Deers, the Kijang, Tapirs, Elephants, wild boars, the Sumatran Rhino, Seladang or the Malayan Gaur - come down to the licks, usually under the cover of the darkness. At this particular salt lick, we found elephant tracks crossing everywhere and elephant dung practically lined the path. The guides taught us that if water left in the deep indentation of the elephant print was murky, that meant that the animal had just left the area, if the puddle was clear - that meant that the tracks were probably a couple of days old. The size of the elephant tracks can also tell us the age of the elephant and by examining the tracks and dung found along the trail to and fro the salt lick one can determine the size of the group. The animals also smear mud onto their bodies to clear themselves of parasites and sometimes to seal open wounds from infection and contamination. The male elephants often shovel mud onto their bodies with their tusks. As they leave the area, they smear the mud onto surrounding tree trunks to rid themselves of the boar ticks and also as territorial marking. Males often urinate and defecate around the salt lick area to mark out their territories. After a good educational tour around the area, we headed off to the river for a cool dip. On the way back to our little boat, we bumped into a couple of orang asli. They were having a simple lunch of fruits and even with so little they had with them, they readily offered us their share. The trip had been a long anticipated one and although we were a little disappointed that we hadn’t chanced upon any of the wildlife who left a great many clues of their existence all along the way but it had been a great trip …if nothing else, it was a trip of learning, experience and of sharing. Click for more on the Belum rainforest Update on the Place The penghulu or head of the Jah Hai settlement. Modernities have crept into the lives of these simple folk. Shy of their nakedness, they have now opted for hand-me-down clothes. The trip back to Temenggor should have brought much memory flooding back to the good times we spent 2 years ago at the lake. Things change in the tropics as quickly as seasons change in cold temperates. For many years now, the million year old forest of Belum have been fighting against the mighty force of change. Of the fierce roars of bulldozers that force down its trees and frightening away its inhabitants, displacing them from their natural environment. Some adapt. And for those who don't, they are perilously left to the hands of merciless fate. In the meantime, truckloads of logged timber make their journey along the quiet winding highway that cuts through the forest. Already parts of the forest have been converted into plains. We were told that some of these areas are actually very close to the village of the Orang Temiar at Sungai Chiong. Pollution has laid its damaging route all the way to the lake. "Kalau mandi air tasik, nanti habis badan gatal", an Orang Temiar complains to us that she has to use only the water from an unaffected river, because her body gets all itchy if she washes up in the lake. A fairly common occurrence amongst the Orang Asli is to make a trek through the jungle into the border of Kelantan, going all the way to Gua Musang. Many Orang Asli still prefer to take the jungle route, trekking up and down the hills through the lush jungle, and stopping by the river to drink, or wash, or even for a short invigorating plunge in the cool clear water. Early last year, the experience was quite the opposite. One village elder who went on the trek laments that they were walking mostly on logging tracks which used to be deep virgin forests not too long ago. No more canopy to shelter them from the harsh sun, and they could no longer use the now brown river as a dependable source of water. And recently, there are talks amongst the locals about more logging concessions to tap the resources found in the vast areas of the Lower Belum Valley. The good news is that all these activities have not seem to affect the elephant population in Belum. Some say there is a herd of 15. Apparently there is a lone male who have not quite been accepted by the herd. It is his bad temperament, we were told. The Orang Asli gave out a helpless sigh when we mentioned the word elephant. The elephants have the happy habit of entering into the Orang Asli plantation helping themselves to the greens there. That might not be a good sign at all because that might mean that there isn't enough food elsewhere. But then again, it could also mean that the Orang Asli plantation has encroached into the elephant's path. We were thrilled to see 4 wild elephants while we were there. 2 big ones and 2 round young ones. Being the dry season, these gentle creatures descended to the lake and stayed close to the water source. We are also delighted that we had a near encounter with a tiger. We were trekking and some members of the group smelt the scent of a wild beast. Our guide later confirmed that it was a tiger. We had to cut the trek short, but it was worth the sacrifice. We wonder how many more of them still roam the jungles. The Orang Asli are still there, the Orang Temiar and the Orang Jahai. Like the jungle, they too, have seen and made many changes. The Temiars have relocated their village three times within a period of five years. And the Orang Jahai have decided that they will start cultivating their land; however, not now. Later perhaps. Technology is not something unfamiliar to the Orang Asli these days. Solar power plates propped up by poles stand upright by their homes. There are altogether three television sets in the small community of the Orang Jahai. It is really hard to gauge how much of this development they are grasping. They have simply leap-frogged several (generations) stages of development, right from tree bark to plastic. Can they psychologically manage this change? While tapioca still remains to be their staple diet, they have learnt to make tea and have developed new tastes for other food that not long ago was foreign to them. In fact a young man from the Jahai tribe contended that all this new food has made his body weak. " Dah rasa gula. Dah rasa beras. Badan pun dah lemah. " Rice and sugar seems to have taken the hunter gatherer out of him. The lure of modernity is strong, and it is not hard for them to be enticed by its pleasures. While some Orang Asli have successfully found themselves quite comfortable with the modern way of life, a lot of them are still struggling between wanting to be modern and having the heart (and soul) to be modern. Men, both young and old, have found jobs in towns, but more often than not they cannot stay long in employment. A village headman told us with despair written on his face that all his attempts to work resulted in failure "9 to 5 just does not suit me. " And the same goes to many others who cannot cope with the stress. The best thing must be to return to the jungle then? Perhaps, because that is what a lot of them do. But when they return home, they find themselves in more of a situation, because there is no work there! In the end, they find work with logging companies around the area. It seems like a cruel turn of events, because aren't they working towards destroying their jungle, their home? This is a place so sacred to them, and a place they respect as their ancestral hunting grounds. Would working with loggers be a long term solution that would in the end benefit them? The Orang Asli have learnt to receive visitors into their villages. They are quite quick to hand their visitors book for us to sign our names in, but whether or not they are happy to have strangers coming into their homes is not within our knowledge. This is after all their home, and they are not there to be on display. While they give us the obliging bashful attention, we should show a higher respect to them for letting us intrude into their private space. Perhaps, we should not even be going into their homes. But, that is what we seem to be doing to them. Entering in to their lives and showing them new technology, and telling them that this is a much better life. But really, is a better life good for them? The Orang Asli are unique. They have developed a lifestyle which have suited them for centuries. And they like this lifestyle, and would love to continue to live this way. It is fair to say that they do like some aspects of the new world. And if they choose our life, can they still continue living their life, and yet have the best of both worlds? What would be good for them is that the modernity that they choose (as opposed to one obliged or impressed upon them) would work to their advantage, and not against them. There is a small number of the Orang Asli who have found their own answer to this. We were told that there are small pockets of tiny communities of the Orang Asli in the deep jungles of Belum who denounce modernity. They are very happy with their chosen isolation from the outside world. And bravo to them! Having said all this, there is one poignant moment that put a smile on our faces. We were walking towards an open space, and found a whole group of women, just doing nothing. There they were contentedly squatting around on the hot orange earth. Nearly all women had a child on their laps. Just like their mothers, and their mothers before them. In this picture, the only thing that is missing are the loin-clothes. And that would not make a difference at all. Because something tells us that in their minds they wear it on them all the time. best time to go Try to avoid the rainy season as it may get a bit too challenging to trek. The wetter months are May-October, although we get rain all year round. getting there By car From Kuala Lumpur, take the north-south highway and head north towards Ipoh. Passing Ipoh, take the Kuala Kangsar exit, and head towards Gerik. Take route 4, which is the east-west highway. This will take you to Pulau Banding. Journey from KL is about 5 ½ hours. Entrance to Belum Rainforest is best arranged with resort owners in the area, as arranging with State Forestry Department or the Department of Wildlife and National Parks can be a little trying. By bus You could catch a coach from KL to Gerik and from there take a taxi to Banding. check out the gerik coaches.

Temenggor tilapia. Temenggor forest reserve. Our very last moment in Belum. Good bye Belum, i vowed to return some day! " I am coming home, i am coming home tell the world, i am coming home". Tailed Jay ( Graphium agamemnon), devouring minerals from otter feeding ground in Belum. This type of butterfly flies actively under the scorching sun and frequently visits flower for nectar. The male sometimes comes down to wet grounds for water. It breeds throughout the year but is especially abundant between November and February. Male Common bluebottle ( Graphium sarpedon) congregate with other butterfly species on the river bank. Male and female butterflies are not often found together. Indeed, the males of some species often congregate with other male species rather than with their own females, at moist spot on forest roads and on sand banks by rivers and streams, where larger animals have come to drink and have contaminated the sand with their urine.... in this case, a family of otters. Its like a drinking spot specially for male.... like a bar! Man taking a morning bath in Temengor lake of Banding Island. A pair of flycatcher drying their wings before take off for their daily routine. Its early in the morning in our last day at Belum-Temenggor. Eurasian Tree Sparrow, Passer montanus, Ciak Rumah The Eurasian tree sparrow is widespread in the towns and cities of eastern Asia, very common here in Malaysia. This species is a predominantly seed and grain eating bird which feeds on the ground in flocks. This is Grey-headed Canary Flycatcher ( Culiciapa ceylonensis), a totally protected, very small bird species roaming among giant trees of Belum rainforest. It is hard to get on camera because of it small size and fast flying habit in the middle and upper rainforest canopy as it looking for insects. Lantern bug ( Pyrops candelaria) feeding on the sap of rainforest tree. Our guide spotted this bug near Kuala Ruoh waterfall in Belum area. The bug doesnt emit any light at all, it is called Lanternbug because of their bright contrasting colour compare to their environtment. A pair of Lantern bug, feeding on the sap from a tree in Royal Belum forest. Its long needle shaped mouth piece is used to pierced tree bark to reached the sap. Once they started, its easy to photographed them.... because they wont move. The only problem is, they are often high in the forest canopy. Belum-Temengor is the largest continuous forest complex in Peninsular Malaysia. Specifically, it is located in the Malaysian state of Perak and crosses into Southern Thailand. Belum-Temengor is divided into two sections. Belum is located up north right by the Malaysia-Thailand border while Temengor is south of Belum. The Royal Belum State Park is entirely contained within the forest complex.   Belum-Temengor is believed to have been in existence for over 130 million years making it one of the world’s oldest rainforests, older than both the Amazon and the Congo.. [1] In the heart of the forest lies the manmade lake of Tasik Temenggor, covering 15, 200 Hectares which is dotted with hundreds of islands. Tasik Temenggor (man made lake), Belum Rain Forest, Perak, Malaysia   This rain forest is believed to be over 130 million years old, which is older than both Amazon and Congo! Courtesy: Wikipedia Best View Large HERE   My e-Book about Toning now available ONLINE   I've a clean shot actually, I mean without the small boat on the left side, but I didn't like her expression, so I choose this one, her expression was quite "Okey" to me, I'm just too lazy to "Clear" those boat in sight. Actually the small boat on the left side is from another group member of the expedition, we have six group with three boats to share, two group on one boat...   At least with the boat in sight, you get to hear my story... :-). Kemesraan alam jelas sekali akrab dan lengkap melengkapi dalam mempersembahkan keindahan, peka pada perubahan dan sentiasa berjasa.. Namun ada ketika alam bagai menderita...!! kerana lamanya menahan penderaan..   Location:- Tasek Temenggor Lembah Belum, Grik Perak. Malaysia. Another shot from Belum Rainforest Resort's jetty. No HDR this time.   Explored on 11/6/08, highest at #404. A green Lanternbug from Belum. We got 2 out of 3 known species of Lanternbug in our Belum - Temenggor expedition. Look at the stilts. They are all crooked. According to the owner, the stilts are bent because of strong winds at night which have been going on for the past few months. In photo: The old and new house @ Temenggor Lake, Perak, MALAYSIA. Dead tree over the lake of Temengor in the deep of Royal Belum forest reserved.   Please contact me at to purchase or to have a permission to use this image. Please do not abuse this image without my consent. Rafflesia azlanii grow on tetrasigma vines under rainforest in Belum. The area got 3 out of 8 Rafflesia found in Malaysia. This species of Rafflesia was first discovered in Sg Halong in Belum in 1993. Then it is named after the Sultan of Perak in 2003. Bronchocela cristatella, a Green Crested tree Lizard.... in its green camouflage form. Under stress its can change to brown or dark grey. This arboreal lizard prefer undisturbed forest as in this Belum area. Children of Orang Asli or aborigines from Jahai tribe paddling across the big lake in Belum. Their villages usually situated near water scattered throughout the area. They usually involved in tourism as guide, boatman or resort casual workers. In photo: A calm day @ Temenggor Lake, Perak, MALAYSIA. Sunrise & Lake Temenggor Bridge " Welcome to the 'rain'forest", say our guide when we reached Belum Rainforest Resort jetty at Pulau Banding. He got it right because its rainning heavily all the way to the jungle camp in Sungai Enam where we stay for 3 days. Belum - Temenggor is the longest continuous forest complex in Peninsular Malaysia, located in state of Perak. Divided into two area, Belum in the north and Temenggor in the south. Some says it is more than 130 million years old..... older than the Amazon. The boat journey to Sungai Enam camp marked the beginning of my adventure in Belum - Temenggor...... more pictures to come.... Panorama sunset at Royal Belum Forest, Perak. Taken at an island near the Kiroi waterfall, which, unfortunately, was dry during our visit.   Belum-Temengor is the largest continuous forest complex in Peninsular Malaysia. It is located in the Malaysian state of Perak and crosses into Southern Thailand.   Belum-Temengor is believed to have been in existence for over 130 million years, making it one of the world’s oldest rainforests, older than both the Amazon and the Congo. In the heart of the forest lies the manmade lake of Tasik Temenggor, covering 15, 200 Hectares which is dotted with hundreds of islands.   Panorama 6 horizontal images. Original resolution is 11, 067x4147   Nikon D600 | Nikkor 17-35mm @25mm    -----------------------------   HDR/DRI/Timelapse personal / group workshop is available upon request. PM me for details:)   -all rights reserved- -contact me for information on licensing of my images and timelapse clips-   View my Most Interesting In Flickriver. Visit my flickr | 500px | Getty Images | Pond5 | facebook | pinterest | twitter | imagekind | World Images I took my family for a short getaway to Belum Rainforest Resort a week ago and we had so much fun boating around the Banding/Temenggor Lake, viewing Rafflesia blooms, visiting the local indigenous people's village and jungle trekking. Here's one taken the resort's jetty in HDR (from 5 RAWs).   Interested to see a bigger version: View On Black   Sorry to all my contacts as I haven't been visiting all of your photostreams lately. I've been too busy with work and family commitments. I hope to catchup very soon. Have a nice weekend everybody.   Thanks to all that have paid a visit, this one made it to EXPLORE's front page, currently at #2! Temenggor Lake is the second largest lake in Peninsula Malaysia after Kenyir Lake in Terengganu, Malaysia. This man made lake is located south of 1, 533 m high Ulu Titi Basah peak, in Hulu Perak district in the state of Perak. It was created after the construction of Temenggor Dam to generate electric power. The lake is located about 45 km from the Hulu Perak district capital, Gerik. Lake Temenggor Bridge on the East-West Highway which crosses the lake. We were having dinner at Sungai Enam Camp in Belum, when this small beetle drop by to join us....... attracted to the light. If it can talk it will say, "hey, what the #*[email protected]! is u guys doing here? Go home and stop that noise, my family is trying to sleep! ". Jahai Boy of Sg Tiang in deep of Royal Belum. Please contact me at to purchase or to have a permission to use this image. Please do not abuse this image without my consent. Zosterops auriventer Belum Temenggor Forest Reserve Perak, Malaysia Loriculus galgulus Belum Temenggor Forest Reserve Perak, Malaysia The Titiwangsa Mountains, also known as "Banjaran Besar" by locals, are the main mountain range that forms the backbone of the Malay Peninsula. The northern section of the range is in Southern Thailand, where it is known as Sankalakhiri Range. This picture was taken on a misty morning. In photo: The view @ Lake Temenggor, Perak, MALAYSIA. A break from putting up photos taken from Temenggor Lake. This was captured many years ago when I was travelling on Bera Lake with the Semelai.   In photo: Water lily @ Tasek Bera, Pahang, MALAYSIA. Small-clawed Otter ( Amblonyx cinerea), is a small otter which active by day and seen on the banks of rivers, sometimes in small family parties. It feeds on fish, frogs, crabs and water snails. The fore feet are used for finding and catching prey and are very 'clever' at manipulation. They give headache to the other group that going to Belum for fishing. For photography group, this is a give from God! The inside part of Rafflesia cantleyii. The biggest flower in the world is a parasite that thrives on tetrasigma vines under rainforest trees in Belum. IMPORTANT: Please do not ever use my photographs on websites, blogs or other media without my explicit permission.   A brief lesson for you guys. Who knows right, one day you might need to thatch a new roof for your house using natural produce like palm leaves.   The lesson begins:   First, you have to cut/get rid of the thorns on the stem. The thorns are very tiny, thus it's advisable to wear hand gloves. If you don't, you'll end up scratching your hands NON-STOP when the thorns get under your skin. (This Jahai girl does not need hand gloves because she is already an expert).   Second, place the leaves in front of you and make sure you have enough space to move it around. Start folding the leaves (like what the girl is doing) from your right, all the way to the left end.   Third, (is there a third step? ), I think that's all for folding the leaves. *_*   In photo: Jahai girl skillfully helping out @ Temenggor Lake, Perak, MALAYSIA.   P. S. I roughly know how to do it since I have tried it myself. I didn't have hand gloves with me at that time, but then I thought this could be the one and only opportunity for me. So what the heck. This Orang Asli (aborigines) from Jahai Tribe lives in Lake Temenggor, Royal Belum Malaysia. Malaysia is Truly Asia, as the cap printed..... This is sexual part of Rafflesia cantleyii. Its emit carion-smell odour which attract pollinators such as flies, ants, jungle rat and wild pigs. Now i hope u guys can understand the relationship between sexual part and carion-smell.......... ha ha ha! A Siamang ( Hylobates syndactylus), the largest gibbon species, taking a rest high on the rainforest canopy. This species restricted to Peninsular Malaysia and Sumatera. Found mainly in tall forest in hilly area. Sunrise at Banding Island. Temenggor Lake is the second largest lake in Peninsula Malaysia after Kenyir Lake in Terengganu, Malaysia. This man-made lake is located south of 1, 533 m high Ulu Titi Basah peak, in Hulu Perak district in the state of Perak. There is a man-made island, Banding Island (Pulau Banding) and Lake Temenggor Bridge on the East-West Highway which crosses the lake.   Thank you for viewing. Copyright © Frahman Photography. All rights reserved Temenggor Lake is the second largest lake in Peninsula Malaysia after Kenyir Lake in Terengganu, Malaysia. This man-made lake is located in Hulu Perak district in the state of Perak. It was created due to the construction of Temenggor Dam to generate electric. There is a man-made island, Banding Island and Lake Temenggor Bridge on the East-West Highway which crosses the lake.   Lake Temenggor Bridge is the longest highway bridge on the East-West Highway, Federal route 4. It crosses Temenggor Lake, a hydroelectric dam in Perak, Malaysia. To the north of Lake Temenggor, north of Peninsula Malaysia (Perak), there is a vast forest area Intact Forest known as yet. This area is one of the largest forest reserves that have not been explored in Peninsular Malaysia. The presence of large mammals such as elephants, rhinoceroses, tapirs and tigers makes yet very special.   Forest has a rich flora and fauna of the area remains unexplored.   Various tour operators now offer guided tours to certain areas of the reserve and will arrange the necessary permits, road and river transport and accommodation, including camping.   Thank you for viewing. This is White-bellied Sea Eagle ( Haliaeetus leucogaster), biggest raptor in the area, having lunch on dead tree bark in Belum. Its usually gives loud serial screaming, catches fish from water surface and sometime feed on refuse. Found mainly on coastal area but in this case, far up inland. I wish you have a brighter day tomorrow. :-)   In photo: View from the hut @ Lake Temenggor, Perak, MALAYSIA. One of the untouched nature attraction in Royal Belum.

Temenggor Download. Tonight This weekend Feb 21 - Feb 23 Next weekend Feb 28 - Mar 1 Belum Rainforest Resort Belum Rainforest Resort 3. 5 out of 5. 0 Pulau Banding, Temenggor, Perak $102 Per night/room Mar 12 - Mar 13 At Belum Rainforest Resort, guests have access to an outdoor pool, a rooftop terrace, and free WiFi in public areas. If you decide to drive, there's free parking.... Belum Adventure Camp Belum Adventure Camp 1. 0 out of 5. 0 Pulau Banding, Hulu Perak, Temenggor, Perak Belum Adventure Camp offers a picnic area, a garden, and barbecue grills. Free parking is included with your stay. Front-desk staff are standing by 24/7 to assist...

Temenggong abdul rahman. The artificial lake of Temenggor is the second largest lake in Peninsula Malaysia. Home to  23 main species of freshwater fish,  and  5 species of turtles, and several aquatic and amphibian species too. It’s made of 6, 050 million cubic meters of water covering an area of ​​117, 500 hectares. This man-made lake was created after the completion of the Temenggor dam in 1974. The now forty years old body of water holds hydro-electric importance for the local population in the northern Perak State. Moreover, it had an historic military strategic role in cutting supplies and communication to communist guerrilla groups that used the rainforest as a shelter. Lake Temenggor satellite view Angler Paradise Given the secluded and peaceful nature  that imbues the whole area, a very rich and dense population of fishes and aquatic species has since developed in its lake and surrounding streams. There are no endangered species of fishes in Belum. Some type of fishing, as it happens in others areas too, is even encouraged in order to balance certain fish population. For anglers, many species of fish, like Toman ( Giant Snakehead) and Sebarau ( Hampala Barb  – jungle perch) are the main target species. Other species like Lampam Sungai ( Barboides), Kelah ( Malaysian Mahseer), Kawan (Friendly Barb), Kalui ( Giant Gouramy), Baung ( Catfish) and many more are common in Belum-Temenggor area. Fishing in Belum Temenggor is possible all year around. The best time being during the monsoon season from October till January. Check the proposed activities and book directly from our website fishing experiences in Belum. Toman fish catch The “catch and release” policy is practiced in the rainforest reserve. Four species of fish, known locally as sebarau, kelah, tengalan and temoleh cannot be carry out of Royal Belum. For other species, each individual angler can take a maximum of three fishes out of this protected area. All fishing boats leaving Royal Belum may be subject of inspection by the Perak State park ranger patrols. They may issue fines and other penalties to whomever is in breach of the Park rules. The Toman “Fishzilla” The key attraction to fish in Temenggor lake is surely the Toman (also known as  Giant Snakehead  or Giant mudfish). The lake is home to the biggest and fiercest Channa micropeltes  in the world. With few unpressed destinations remaining whereby, the snakehead thrive and grow to maximum twenty kilograms.  National Geographic has referred to snakeheads such as those of Belum, as “Fishzilla”. Snakehead fishing in Temenggor is accessible to anglers of all skill levels. It offers greater chances of “monster snakehead” all year round because there are many fishes leading to more opportunities for a memorable catch. Snakeheads between two and three kilos are considered as small. Four to six kilos are very common. Seven to eight kilos are considered as big fish. Anything over that, up to twenty kilos, are a frightening possibility. Fishing in Belum Snakehead fishing with experts The visitors need permits to enter the protected areas of Belum by boat. They may also need fishing permits for recreational fishing activities. If you book fishing experiences in Belum straight from this website, all necessary permits are in the packages. You can rent the necessary fishing equipment as well. Furthermore, boatmen and support staff will not only get you and your group to the best spots for fishing, to fit your preferences and skill levels, but they will also provide assistance in case you need to tune your skills to get a better toman catch. Some of the most proven  snakehead fishing techniques are summarized here, along with the recommended fishing tackle specifications: Random Marginal Snakehead Casting (lure only)  – Consists of casting lures from a boat moving at a “walking pace” speed following shorelines. Most used surface lures qre frogs, buzz baits and poppers. The popper being the most effective, but only in low weed areas. It’s “random” casting because it is simply targeting the likely looking fish. Holding areas at random along the shoreline, as the boat moves, to cover a wider area. This technique is used all year round. But it’s best during the mating season, when snakeheads wander looking for a mate and begin nest building. It will allow to catch mostly juvenile specimens. Open Water Rising Snakehead Casting (lure or live bait) – Casting lures from a standing boat nearby spots, where individual snakeheads rise from deep water to breathe some air. This is the most difficult and challenging form of fishing, as it requires not only patience, but great aiming and casting skills. The lure has to get right in front of the fish mouth at a certain depth. Usually, there is only one casting chance. In case of success, though, the reward is great. Any snakehead rising in deep open water is sure to be of the biggest kind. Fry Ball Casting (lure or live bait) – Consists of tracking a fry ball from a boat while keeping at casting range and following the ball’s direction. Each time the ball of bright red or orange fry surfaces for air, the anglers cast their lure at the fry ball. The male adult will be closest to the fry to guide them. The larger female will be patrolling the outside of the fry ball for invaders. It is worth casting ahead of the fry ball in the direction they are swimming, to catch the larger female first. Snakehead lure fishing tackle Rods: 6ft – 7ft rods for lure fishing is the best range. However, 7ft will offer more accurate casting and greater distance. Longer than this, for boat fishing, is a disadvantage. It is also adding a second difficulty to play fish diving under and around the boat. Stiffer rod grade medium with heavier action of ½ oz – 1 ½ oz or 18-26lb class is necessary to cast live baits and setting the hooks. Fixed spool spinning reels are best for live bait fishing, the same size & models as for lure fishing is fine. Reels: Baitcast reels are a much better to lure fishes than spinning reels. But, it requires a good amount of practice. The quality of spinning reels should, of course, be good. But it’s not as important as the quality of bait casting reels, which, unless is of high value, is more of a hindrance than a help. Lines: Braid of at least 50lb is mandatory, up to 65lb. Fluorocarbon will not suffice as a leader for live bait fishing. A heavy wire trace of 60lb is essential to prevent bite off. Most snakehead caught on live baits will take the hook down into their mouths. Hooks: Original hooks that come with lures are useless for snakehead; they need to replace it with stinger trebles in sizes 2 or 4 to hold the power of a big snakehead, and they will change it every few fish. The spilt rings to attach the hooks needs to change with heavy duty ones in sizes 4 or 5. Lures: A good selection of lures from each category: surface frogs, buzz baits & poppers. Diving plugs in varying depths, patterns and colours. Two of every category, pattern and colour is a good idea in case there is a particularly effective lure that is then lost;  4 – 6 inch lures are generally a good size range for snakehead. Bait: A ~6” walking catfish hooked once through the upper back of the bait behind the dorsal fin is most effective for snakehead fishing. The walking catfish is a natural predator of snakehead fry and therefore triggers an immediate strike from the adult snakehead, most of the time attacking from behind hence the hooking position on the live bait.

Tasik temenggor. This repository has been disabled. Access to this repository has been disabled by GitHub staff due to excessive use of resources, in violation of our Terms of Service. Please contact support to restore access to this repository. Read here to learn more about decreasing the size of your repository. Temenggor lake peninsular malaysia. Free Full watch Temenggor online rapidvideo TeMenggor tv Watch Online HBO Free. Temenggor lake. Temenggor lake resort. The Temengor Dam or Temengor Hydro-Electric Project or Temengor Power Station is a dam in Gerik, Perak, Malaysia. It is located on Perak River about 200 km northeast of Ipoh. Construction of the dam impounded Temenggor Lake. Power station [ edit] The power station is a hydroelectric power station, using 4 Hitachi turbines of 87 MW installed capacity and the average annual energy generation 900 million units. The station is operated by Tenaga Nasional. Since 1987 Temenggor has been unmanned and is remotely operated via a SCADA system at the Bersia Group Control Centre. In the late 1990s, facilities were added to enable Automatic generation control by TNB's National Load Despatch Centre in Kuala Lumpur. Overview [ edit] Construction started in January 1974 and completed in mid-1978. The first unit commissioned on 1 October 1977. Technical specifications [ edit] The permanent dam components are as follows: Main Dam Maximum height above foundation of 128 metres (420 ft), and crest length of 537 metres (1, 762 ft), volume of fill is 7. 09 million cubic metres. Crest elevation is 258 metres (846 ft) above sea level (ASL), Full Supply Level (FSL) is at EL 248. 42mSLE, average operating level is at EL244. 00mSLE, minimum operating level for Unit 1, Unit 3 and Unit 4 is at EL 236. 5mSLE. For Unit 2, it can go down to EL 221mSLE. Reservoir area at 245 metres (804 ft) ASL is 152 square kilometres (59 sq mi). Storage volume is 5, 300 million cubic meters at EL 244. 00mSLE. At FSL total storage is 6, 050 million cubic meters. Power Intake Structure - 4 bays. Spillway - free flow spillway, weir with chute and flip bucket. Maximum discharge capacity at Reservoir Flood Level at EL 252. 00mSLE is 2830m3/s. At this elevation the dam is holding 890million cubic meters of flood water or equivalent to 3months of annual average rainfall. This water will be discharge to downstream gradually in not less than one month. Power Tunnels - 4 tunnels. Length about 850 ft Average diameter 5. 5m, steel lined Powerhouse surface powerhouse with 4 penstocks to powerhouse comprising 4 turbines of 87MW each, 4 air-cooled generators of 100MVA each and 4 transformers of 100MVA each. Turbine type is vertical Francis, manufactured by HITACHI of Japan. Turbine shaft rated output is about 90MW at rated gross head of 101m. Maximum plant discharge is 4X100m3/s. Plant rated annual energy production is 870GWh based on annual rainfall of 3, 700 million cubic metres. Temenggor Dam is now the third largest dam in Malaysia. It was once the largest dam and largest hydroelectric generation facility upon completion in 1979, before being overtaken by the Kenyir Dam in 1985. It holds a special place in the history of Malaysia for its military role in flooding the Upper Perak River and cutting off the communist terrorists' infiltration route from the Betong salient in Thailand. See also [ edit] Tenaga Nasional References [ edit] Temengor Hydro-Electric Project, The resident engineer's completion report, Vol. 1, Report 5067-01-80, June 1980 External links [ edit] TNB webpage [1] [ permanent dead link] Coordinates: 5°24′24″N 101°18′04″E  /  5. 40667°N 101. 30111°E
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Temenggor lake fishing. Temenggor forest reserve resorts. Temenggor lake perak. Temenggor dam power station.




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